University blog: Creative technologies (Week Four)

IP Rights, Copyright and Their Importance in the Creative Industries
By Emma Grey

Sounds dull, right? Well…. Yeah it kind of is… but it’s also a very important part of the creative Industries, especially if you are making original work and posting it online. If you want to be successful you have to understand this, as boring as it may sound. IP stands for Intellectual Property, or in a simpler definition... Copyright. Now after the huge success of YouTube pretty much everyone knows about copyright now, considering films are removed from the website all too often now.

What is Intellectual Property?
If you have an original idea, Intellectual Property are the laws put in place to help protect your work and stop others from stealing it. It is copyrighted to you, and anyone else who steals it or tries to make it their own will have their content removed, or in extreme cases will be fined and taken to court. Bet you don’t feel like downloading that old 1970’s movie now, huh? 

Well, court is unusual, and only happens in extreme cases… But people who create original content and rely solely on it such as freelancers, take IP rights very seriously. Something as simple as using music in your video or film that you don’t have permission to use could lead to it being taken down after all your hard work.

What Isn’t Protected by IP Rights?
The Public Domain is a collection of copyright free content that is void of any Intellectual Property rights. This is something that has gone past its lifespan, such as an old poem or play. Shakespeare, Jack and the Beanstalk, the many stories recreated by Disney and other companies. All of these were created long ago and their original creators are long deceased, they are now free to use by anyone, to make recreations of or to simply base off another original idea.


See, told you it was important to know, sounds confusing but once you learn what IP stands for and falls under, it’s much easier to know what it’s all about and how to avoid any prosecutions. 
ARTWORK BY EMMA GREY | DESIGN DEVELOPED BY PRETTYWILDTHINGS